The Completed “Good Book of Pedantry and Wonder” Set!

Remember when the set for The Good Book looked like this, just a few weeks ago?

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Well, dear voracious audience members, we have come a long way. 

Ta-da!!

But how did we arrive at such glorious completion so quickly?  With the help of our build team, staff, and many, many volunteers!  This set took 56 labor hours just to build the cyc, around 220 hours for the rest of the set dressing, 288 hours of scenic design work (excluding the staff), 64 hours working on the lighting (excluding the staff), 3 gallons of flame retardant, 81 cheeseboroughs, and $90 worth of craft glue.  In addition, literally tens of thousands of pieces of paper were ripped and folded into quarters, and our set designer drove 800 miles round trip for a desk.  Here’s the staff dressing the set with the paper bunches that so many of our volunteers lovingly compiled.

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And now those shelves look like this:

Chuck Olsen’s amazing props are part of the set itself, giving it a warm, lived-in feel.  For example, James Murray’s desk is on a platform raised by books.   Don’t you wish your office looked like this?

The set is amazingly detailed, with several unexpected surprises nuanced hints about the setting, like the twigs and moss around the corners of the stage.

Not pictured: Bruno Louchouarn’s wonderful sound design and fascinating original compositions; the enviable period costumes by Dianne Graebner; the wit and heart of the script by Moby Pomerance; how amazing our actors are!

Also, I should tell you that I’m not authorized to show you the coolest part of the set.  You’ll have to come see it for yourselves.  Here are a couple of teasers…

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Get your tickets to see all the incredible things we can cram into a 99-seat theater!

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One response to “The Completed “Good Book of Pedantry and Wonder” Set!

  1. Pingback: The Good Book of Pedantry and Wonder « Angry Patrons

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